Site Meter >
fusion
psycho-body
psycho-body
psycho-body
psycho-body
psycho-body

The studios of...

The Triple Alpha Process

Sorry, your browser doesn't support embedding multimedia. Please <a href="/browserupgrades.html">upgrade your browser</a>.




catenoid In mathematics and physics, a soliton is a self-reinforcing solitary wave (a wave packet or pulse) that maintains its shape while it travels at constant speed.










     The triple alpha process is a set of nuclear fusion reactions by which three helium nuclei (alpha particles) are transformed into carbon.      Formation of the carbon atomic nucleus requires a nearly simultaneous triple collision of alpha particles (helium nuclei) within the core of a giant or supergiant star. This happens in conditions of temperature and helium concentration that the rapid expansion and cooling of the early universe prohibited, and therefore no significant carbon was created during the Big Bang. Instead, the interiors of stars in the horizontal branch transform three helium nuclei into carbon by means of this triple-alpha process. In order to be available for formation of life as we know it, this carbon must then later be scattered into space as dust, in supernova explosions, as part of the material which later forms second, third-generation star systems which have planets accreted from such dust. The Solar System is one such third-generation star system.


















Subspace Suppression




     The bound state of two solitons is known as a bion.

     In field theory BIon usually refers to the solution of the Born?Infeld model. The name appears to have been coined by G.W. Gibbons in order to distinguish this solution from the conventional soliton, understood as a regular, finite-energy (and usually stable) solution of a differential equation describing some physical system. The word regular means a smooth solution carrying no sources at all. However, the solution of the Born-Infeld model still carries a source in the form of a Dirac-delta function at the origin. As a consequence it displays a singularity in this point (although the electric field is everywhere regular). In some physical contexts (for instance string theory) this feature can be important, which motivated the introduction of a special name for this class of solitons.

      On the other hand, when gravity is added (i.e. when considering the coupling of the Born?Infeld model to General Relativity) the corresponding solution is called EBIon, where "E" stands for "Einstein".

www.000webhost.com